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Adapting to a New Energy Era: Beijing Workshop 2014

On Thursday, October 23, The National Bureau of Asian Research (NBR) and China Institutes of Contemporary International Relations (CICIR) co-hosted an invitation-only workshop in Beijing on “Adapting to a New Energy Era.” This full-day event featured senior policymakers, industry leaders, and top energy and geopolitical specialists.

Event Materials

Agenda (PDF)

Speaker Biographies (PDF)

More Information

To learn more, please contact:

Clara Gillispie
Assistant Director of Trade, Economic, and Energy Affairs
(202) 347-9767
eta@nbr.org

World energy markets have undergone a seismic shift in the past ten years, driven by the unexpected boom in U.S. and Canadian production of shale gas, tight oil, and heavy oil. These changes have accelerated an already steady decline in U.S. imports of Middle East oil and gas. At the same time, China, Japan, and the rest of Asia have emerged as major importers of oil and natural gas from the Persian Gulf.

Given these broad changes in both energy markets and global strategic priorities, there is an urgent need for the United States, Japan, China, and other countries in the Asia-Pacific to develop new, more collaborative regional energy security strategies and approaches to stabilizing the Gulf.

With this in mind, panel discussion examined:

  • Current U.S. and Asian energy security strategies for oil and LNG supply security, including how the policies and economic considerations that underlie these strategies are changing
  • China’s evolving energy security outlook, and how Chinese industry and policy are assessing both policy options in the Middle East and what impact U.S. policy will have on future approaches
  • New opportunities for strengthening regional collaboration in the Asia-Pacific, including examining the prospects for coordinated strategic policy to enhance Gulf stability and the security of oil and LNG transport
  • Likely resource and commitment requirements for China, the United States, Japan, and other states in Asia to achieve common goals.


Speakers Included

Chen Weidong
CNOOC Energy Economics Institute

Edward C. Chow
Center for Strategic and International Studies

Fu Mengzi
China Institutes of Contemporary International Relations

Mikkal Herberg
The National Bureau of Asian Research

James Kim
The Asan Institute of Policy Studies

Meredith Miller
The National Bureau of Asian Research

Yu Nagatomi
Institute of Energy Economics, Japan

Kei Shimogori
Institute of Energy Economics, Japan

Yuji Takagi
Sasakawa Peace Foundation

Eric V. Thompson
Center for Naval Analyses

Akio Takahara
University of Tokyo

Wang Hanling
Chinese Academy of Social Sciences

Xu Qinhua
Renmin University

Yang Guang
Chinese Academy of Social Sciences

Yang Yufeng
Energy Research Institute, NDRC

Zha Daojiong
Peking University

Zhao Hongtu
China Institutes of Contemporary International Relations


About the Project

Through a range of activities—including field research, commissioned papers, workshops, and dialogues with key stakeholders—the project “Adapting to a New Energy Era” aims to provide in-depth and academically rigorous research into how the United States, Japan, South Korea, China, and others countries can craft stronger diplomatic, strategic, and economic tools to support common energy security interests. Learn more.


Sponsor

This initiative is made possible by the generous sponsorship of the Sasakawa Peace Foundation.


Through a range of activities—including field research, commissioned papers, workshops, and dialogues with key stakeholders—the project “Adapting to a New Energy Era” aims to provide in-depth and academically rigorous research into how the United States, Japan, South Korea, China, and other countries can craft stronger diplomatic, strategic, and economic tools to support common energy security interests. Learn more.



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